Thomas Gardiner

Artist Statement

It wasn’t until having moved to the thriving metropolis of New York City that I began documenting the small towns and communities of western Canada where I grew up. In a sense, they’re partly biographical insofar as they represent places where I lived as a child and into my teens. However, having transplanted myself into such a sharply contrasting environment also made me view the place (largely responsible for having shaped me as an individual) in a radically new light. Not only did I begin reflecting on its influence upon me simply for having lived there, but I also began to consider, more generally, the geographic relationships of hinterland regions to major metropolitan centres—as well as the social and economic aspects within these relationships—through the lens of how the camera could interpret them visually.

Western Canada’s small towns and communities are often viewed as existing at a social and economic disadvantage to places with major financial firms and large corporations, such as those radiating from larger city centres. Despite the geographic barriers determining their status as hinterland regions, the citizens living here have had a significant role in forming Canada’s social infrastructure, from universal health care to affordable education. By forging strong community bonds and forming cooperative conglomerations, the people of these regions were able to resist exploitation by the large financial firms in Eastern Canada. (It is worth noting in this regard that the province of Saskatchewan elected the first socialist government in North America in the 1940s.) Since then, the region has gone through many economic and ideological shifts and changes. My photographic project aims to render visually the cumulative aggregate of these changes and influences that have both shaped me as well affected the people and places where I grew up.

Mot de l’artiste

Ce n’est que lorsque j’ai déménagé dans la vibrante métropole de New York City, que j’entrepris de documenter les petites villes et communautés de l’ouest canadien ou j’ai grandi. D’une certaine manière se fut un travail partiellement biographique dans la mesure où ces images représentaient des lieux où j’ai vécu et grandi pendant mon enfance et mon adolescence. Cependant, ma transplantation dans un environnement radicalement différent m’a permis de percevoir de manière complètement différente l’endroit qui a eu un tel impact sur la personne que je suis. Je ne me suis pas simplement contenté de réfléchir à l’impact qu’avoir grandi là-bas a eu sur moi, j’ai aussi commencé à prêter attention, de manière plus générale, aux relations géographiques entre les régions plus reculées et les grands centres urbains ainsi qu’aux aspects socio-économiques de ces relations tels qu’ils pouvaient être interprétés au travers de l’objectif d’un appareil photo.

Les petites villes et communautés de l’ouest canadien sont souvent perçues comme ayant de grands désavantages sur les plans économiques et sociaux comparé à des endroits où l’on trouve d’importantes entreprises financières et des larges sociétés, comme on en trouve dans les grands centres urbains. Malgré les obstacles géographiques qui en font des régions reculées, ceux qui vivent ici jouent un rôle important dans la création des infrastructures sociales canadiennes, de la sécurité sociale à l’éducation pour tous. En tissant des liens communautaires solides et en créant des conglomérats coopératifs, les habitants de ces régions ont pu se défendre contre les grandes entreprises de l’est canadien. (Il est important de noter à cet effet que la province de la Saskatchewan fut la première à élire un gouvernement socialiste en Amérique du Nord dans les années 40). Depuis lors, la région a fait face à de nombreux mouvements et changements économiques et idéologiques. Mes projets photographiques ont pour but de rendre compte de manière visuelle de l’ensemble de ces changements et influences qui ont fait de moi la personne que je suis et ont eu un important impact sur les gens et les lieux où j’ai grandi.

 

Elyse Bouvier

Artist Statement

Royal Cafe is a photo-based documentary project that explores the prevalence of Chinese-Western cafes across small towns in rural Alberta. These cafes—diner-style restaurants caught in an ambiguous time period—reflect the identity of the communities they inhabit and are also indicative of a Canadian culinary identity. Although difficult to define, the hybrid nature of Canadian identity, and the rural identity in particular, can be highlighted through the merging of these two distinct cultures: Chinese and Western.

Mot de l’artiste:

Café Royal est un documentaire photographique qui explore la fréquence de cafés chinois dans les petites villes rurales de l’Alberta. Ces cafés, de type diners perdus dans une époque ambiguë, sont une réflexion de l’identité des communautés qui les peuplent et sont aussi un excellent indicateur de l’identité culinaire canadienne. Bien que difficile à déterminer, la nature hybride de l’identité canadienne, et de l’identité rurale en particulier, peut être soulignée par la fusion de ces deux cultures distinctes : chinoise et de l’ouest.

 

trans.plant

Artist Statement

In a country as large as Canada, regional identity plays a significant role in our sense of who we are. I identify with being an Easterner and Maritimer, but I have lived in the Arctic, central Canada, and now “Out West.” While each move presented challenges, I struggled most with this one. Longing to belong, I search for triggers to memories of my “primal landscape.” These images are a consideration of what might have been a shared history of human experience between an east-coast transplant and those who grew up in Saskatchewan.

Mot de l’artiste:

Dans un pays aussi grand que le Canada, l’identité régionale joue un rôle important sur qui nous sommes. Je suis de l’Est et des Maritimes, mais j’ai vécu dans l’Arctique, au centre du Canada et maintenant à l’Ouest. Bien que chaque déménagement ne soit pas sans inconvénients le plus difficile à gérer fut ce dernier. A la recherche d’un sens d’appartenance, je recherche des éléments me renvoyant à des souvenir de mon « paysage primal. » Ces images sont une considération de ce qui peut être partagé entre un expatrié de la côte Est et ceux qui ont grandi en Saskatchewan.

 

Jessica Auer

Artist Statement

During the summer of 2012, I participated in an artist residency at the Banff Centre in Canada’s most visited national park. Growing weary of contributing to the oversaturation of nearly identical images that are produced by the everyday tourist, I chose to take a few steps back from the traditional viewpoint, to look at tourism from a quasi-anthropological perspective. In On How to View Landscape, I used photo and video cameras to passively record the gestures and actions of tourists who are sightseeing. By shifting focus to the space of the viewer rather than the space being viewed, my work observes these places from a human perspective and on a human scale. The scenes that transpire are sometimes absurd, occasionally melancholic, but altogether banal–reminders of when we may have stood in the same locations or struggled up the trail in search of an individual experience or moments of contemplation.

 Mot de l’artiste:

Pendant l’été 2012, j’ai fait partie des artistes en résidence au Banff Centre, le parc national canadien le plus visité. Fatiguée de contribuer à la surproduction d’images pratiquement identiques produites par les touristes de base, j’ai décidé de prendre du recul du point de vue coutumier et d’étudier le tourisme d’un point de vue presque anthropologique. Dans Comment regarder un paysage, j’utilise la photo et la vidéo pour enregistrer les gestes et actions des touristes en visite. En changeant le centre d’attention du paysage au spectateur, cette œuvre étudie ces espaces d’un point de vue humain et à l’échelle humaine. Les scènes capturées sont parfois absurdes, mélancoliques mais dans l’ensemble un rappel banal de ces moments où nous étions peut-être au même endroit ou avons remonté un sentier a la recherche d’une expérience unique ou d’un instant de contemplation.

 

Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Artist Statement

 In the 1960s, Fort McKay First Nation, situated on the Athabasca River in Northern Alberta, had no roads connecting it to the rest of Canada. They sustained themselves through a traditional economy of hunting and trapping, as their ancestors practiced for generations. However, as community elder Zackary Powder says, “It’s not like it used to be; everything has changed.” Sleeping with the Devil captures the transformation of a community torn between economic development and the endangerment of their land and traditions. Living in the heart of the Oil Sands, some are proud to participate in the economic prosperity, while others decry their powerlessness against environmental destruction.

Mot de l’artiste:

Dans les années 60, la Première Nation de Fort McKay, située le long du fleuve Athabasca dans le nord de l’Alberta, n’était connecté a par aucune route au reste du Canada. Une économie traditionnelle composée de chasse et de pièges leur permettait de subvenir à leurs besoins comme leurs ancêtres le faisaient depuis des générations. Cependant, comme l’ancien Zachary Powder le dit « : les choses ne sont plus comme elles l’étaient, tout a changé. » Dormir avec le Diable documentes les transformations d’une communauté aux prises avec le développement économique et le danger posé à son territoire et ses traditions. Vivant au cœur des sables bitumineux, certains sont fiers de leur participation au développement économique alors que d’autres déplorent leur impuissance face à la destruction environnementale.