Imaginations 5-1 | Perceived Peripherality and Places Images: The City, the Region, the Border | Table of Contents

Guest Editor Susan Ingram

Introduction

Kanak Imaginaries: A Sense of Place in the Work of Déwé Görödé | Raylene Ramsay

A Place to Stand: Land and Water in Māori Film | Deborah Walker-Morrison

Black Wool and Vintage Shoes: The Wellington Look | Felicity Perry

Imagining Place: An Empirical Study of How Cultural Outsiders and Insiders Receive Fictional Representations of Place in Caryl Férey’s Utu | Ellen Carter

NZ@Frankfurt: Imagining New Zealand’s Guest of Honour Presentation at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair from the Point of View of Literary Translation | Angela Kölling

Filmstadt in the Vorstadt: Locationality in the Filmmaking Practice of Mihály/ Michael Kertész/ Curtiz | Susan Ingram

High-Rise Zhivago | Elena Siemens

It’s a Kind of Magic: Situating Nostalgia for Technological Progress and the Occult in Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes | Markus Reisenleitner

Guest Artist—Katrina Sark

Portfolio

classic café | greenery parks | reusing revisioning | border connections elsewhere | border connections within

Les espaces urbains, la vie quotidienne, et l’oeil de l’histoireEntrevue avec Katrina Sark | Martin Parrot

Urban Spaces, Everyday Life and the Eye of HistoryAn Interview with Katrina Sark | Martin Parrot


Full Issue PDF | http://dx.doi.org/10.17742/IMAGE.periph.5-1


Article Abstracts

Kanak Imaginaries: A Sense of Place in the Work of Déwé Görödé | Raylene Ramsay

The study of the Kanak imaginary in the work of the first published Kanak (indigenous) New Caledonian writer shows this to be permeated by a sense of place. Rootedness in, and intense community with the land is not incompatible with the fluidity of ancestral criss-crossing of the Pacific or of constant border-crossing (pathways of exchange between groups) but nonetheless remains central. The ‘hinterland’ constituted by the places of the tribu (customary lands) sets up a challenge to the dominance of Nouméa la blanche and Déwé Görödé’s articulation of places of identity re-negotiate the urban/regional or Noumea/Bush/Tribu nexus to counterbalance or contest national (French) imaginaries. Yet Görödé’s work presents both a return to a Kanak Place to Stand and a critical self in process (the latter situated in a ‘no man’s land’). The places in her work are ultimately ‘cognitively dissonant’: the marginal or hinter-land of Kanak imaginaries (the tribu), can hold (to) their own both outside and inside the city yet also open themselves up internally to multiplicity and critique.

A Place to Stand: Land and Water in Māori Film | Deborah Walker-Morrison

New Zealand (NZ) Māori identity, as is the case for indigenous peoples the world over, is inextricably linked to a sense of place of origin, Tūrangawaewae, literally, “a place to stand one’s feet”. Place here is obviously first and foremost about Land, but also includes the rivers, lakes and sea that have sustained Māori communities since their arrival in Aotearoa, almost a thousand years ago. Linking representations of Land and Water to a re-reading of Paul Gilroy’s twin metaphors of Roots and Routes, this paper reads issues of loss, conservation, regaining and/or transformation of such a sense of place as central to Māori fiction film.

Black Wool and Vintage Shoes: The Wellington Look | Felicity Perry

“He told me I didn’t look like I was from Wellington”, a friend, from a small town almost two hours away, confided to me over a cocktail in a downtown bar. This article asks, what is the Wellington look that this statement describes? How does it produce and reflect Wellington’s reputation as the locus of arts and politics in Aotearoa/New Zealand? It examines how the inhabitants of Wellington weave the fabric of the city together through their dress, analyzing how Wellington-based media, boutiques, designers, and locals together create a style that is distinctively ‘Wellington’.

Imagining Place: An Empirical Study of How Cultural Outsiders and Insiders Receive Fictional Representations of Place in Caryl Férey’s Utu | Ellen Carter

I provide empirical evidence from a longitudinal cross-cultural reader reception survey showing that cultural outsider (French) and insider (New Zealand) readers are differently influenced by the geographically and culturally-situated elements in Utu (French 2004, English translation 2011), a crime novel set in contemporary New Zealand by French writer Caryl Férey. After reading the novel, both cultural outsider and insider readers changed their opinions towards the image portrayed by Férey, even when his cultural claims were incorrect. Furthermore, for French readers, this influence extended beyond Utu’s final page to opinions about New Zealand and its inhabitants.

NZ@Frankfurt: Imagining New Zealand’s Guest of Honour Presentation at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair from the Point of View of Literary Translation | Angela Kölling

With over 7,000 exhibitors from over 100 countries and circa 300,000 visitors each year the Frankfurt Book Fair is a playground for political, economic, and cultural imaginings, including many domestic and foreign places. The Book Fair is often conceived of and studied as a site of intercultural politics and commerce but has not yet fully been explored as a site of translation and translator’s agency. This article offers critical reflections on metaphors for the translator, arguing that a shift of the base metaphor in comparative literature studies of translation from conflict to friction could redirect interdisciplinary translation studies. I propose that the friction metaphor leads toward an appropriate balance between complex detail and ordering reduction of data that allows us to describe the intensity and the challenges of translation without recreating the old-established realities we already know.

Filmstadt in the Vorstadt: Locationality in the Filmmaking Practice of Mihály/ Michael Kertész/ Curtiz | Susan Ingram

The article examines the largest and most monumental of the silent film epics produced in the Austrian republic: Sodom und Gomorrha (1922). In seeking out the film’s shooting location, an abandoned site of clay pits and hilly grasslands at the southern edge of Vienna, the article explores what the site’s history and current incarnation as part of a Kurpark reveal about the filmmaker’s urban imaginary and the role of technology in modernizing it, and it establishes parallels between the early work he did under the name Michael Kertész and the later success of his cult classic Casablanca.

High-Rise Zhivago | Elena Siemens

This article discusses the Taganka Theatre’s production of Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago, staged in a remote Moscow suburb. Performed in a Soviet-built palace of culture, the show radically reinterprets Zhivago, transforming it from an intensely personal to a collective narrative. Drawing on a chapter from my book Theatre in Passing: A Moscow Photo-Diary (Intellect 2011), the paper refers to Marvin Carlson, who argues that theatre buildings and their locations greatly impact the overall meaning of a show. Citing evidence provided by cultural theorists, architectural critics, as well as authors and artists, I expand on my earlier discussion of suburbs—a fertile subject attracting a wealth of contradictory opinions. I illustrate my discussion with images of high-rises inspired by the avant-garde photographer Alexander Rodchenko, and pictures of soup cans and cases of Coca-Cola—my tribute to Andy Warhol, who, like Rodchenko, rejected the old in favour of the new. I conclude with a nostalgic shot of a single-family dwelling, reminiscent of the spaces depicted in Pasternak.

It’s a Kind of Magic: Situating Nostalgia for Technological Progress and the Occult in Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes | Markus Reisenleitner

Guy Ritchie’s recent blockbuster success with a revisionist Sherlock Holmes is the latest in a series of popular films and fiction to have reinvigorated a nostalgic imaginary of London’s past that places the former capital of the Empire at the crossroads of a persistent manichean battle between empiricist-driven technological progress and traditions of occult knowledge supposedly submerged in the 17th century yet continuing to trickle into the heart of the Empire from its colonies. By tracing some of these historical layers sedimented into 21st-century popular imaginaries of London’s past, this article explores the mechanisms of popular culture’s production of nostalgia that mediate public memories and histories and suture them to the imaginary urban geographies that constitute the space of the global city through its metonymic sites and its materialized histories.

About the Contributors

Ellen Carter is a PhD student jointly enrolled at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France. Her research centres on how cultural outsiders write, translate and read cross-cultural crime fiction.

Susan Ingram is Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities at York University, Toronto, where she is affiliated with the Canadian Centre for German and European Studies and the Research Group on Translation and Transcultural Contact. She is the general editor of Intellect Book’s Urban Chic series and the editor of the World Film Locations volume on Berlin.

Angela Kölling is a Postdoc at the Centre for European Research at Gothenburg University in Sweden. She received her PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Auckland and published her work on creative nonfiction in post-1989 France and Germany as a book entitled Writing on the Loose (Weidler Berlin) in 2012. Currently, her research focuses on the role and (self-)positioning of literary translators in intercultural cooperative systems, such as focus country presentations at international book fairs. She investigates, in particular, how metaphors filter the perception of the work-life situations and the potential action radius of translators both from the point of view of practitioners and researchers.

Martin Parrot is a documentary filmmaker, a PhD student in Humanities at York University, and blogger/cultural critique at monlimoilou.com.

Felicity Perry is author of a doctoral thesis examining the relationship between dress, identity and the media. It explored how students at an urban non-uniformed secondary school in Aotearoa/New Zealand use dress—and dress-related discourses—to both construct and express their identity. Perry’s continuing research is based on an interest in the relationship between media and the workings of everyday life, examining the ways in which gender, sexuality, race, class, and appearance intersect in social interactions. Perry is currently living in Tel Aviv, enjoying the opportunities for dress analysis available in this diverse city.

Raylene Ramsay is Professor of French at the University of Auckland. She has published a translation of the first novel (The Wreck, Little island Press) and the poems of the Kanak woman writer, Déwé Görödé with Deborah Walker-Morrison (Sharing as Custom Provides, Pandanus Press) and edited and co-authored Nights of Storytelling. A Cultural History of Kanaky/New Caledonia (University of Hawaii Press). A study of hybridity in the literatures of the French Pacific is forthcoming with Liverpool University Press in 2014. She has also published books on French Women in Politics, Writing Power, Paternal Legitimization and Maternal Legacies (Berghahn Press) and on ‘autofiction’ (The French New Autobiographies) and the French new novel (Robbe-Grillet and Modernity, Science, Sexuality, and Subversion, University Press of Florida).

Markus Reisenleitner is Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Humanities at York University, Toronto. His research and publications focus on urban imaginaries, fashion and digital cultures.

Katrina Sark is a PhD candidate in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at McGill University, specializing in cultural analysis and urban cultures. She has co-authored Berliner Chic: A Locational History of Berlin Fashion (with Susan Ingram) and assisted with the research for Wiener Chic. Her photographs have been printed in Inquire: Journal of Comparative Literature (2010), Berliner Chic (2011), World Film Locations: Berlin (2012), and can be seen on her blog: http://suitesculturelles.wordpress.com/. She lives in Montreal.

Elena Siemens is Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies, University of Alberta. Her research interests include visual culture, theoretical and practical photography, performing arts (especially spaces of performance), and cultural and critical theory. She is the author of Theatre in Passing: A Moscow Photo-Diary (Intellect UK 2011), and editor of two recent collections of essays, The Dark Spectacle: Landscapes of Devastation in Film and Photography (Space and Culture: International Journal of Social Spaces, Summer 2014), and Scandals of Horror (Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Images Studies, Issue 1-4, 2013).

Deborah Walker-Morrison is Senior Lecturer and Head of French at the University of Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand. Her principal research and teaching interests are in French cinema, Maori Cinema, and translation studies, with a particular focus on the translation of indigenous Pacific literatures. Of European and Maori descent, her kiwi affiliations are to the Rākai Pāka and Ngāti Pahuwera hapu of Ngāti Kāhungunu. As well as numerous articles and book chapters, she has published French and American Noir: Dark Crossings (Palgrave 2009, with Alistair Rolls) and Le style cinématographique d’Alain Resnais (Edwin Mellen Press, 2012).

Résumés des articles

Kanak Imaginaries: A Sense of Place in the Work of Déwé Görödé | Raylene Ramsay

L’étude de l’imaginaire Kanak dans l’œuvre de Déwé Görödé révèle la centralité de l’enracinement dans la terre. L’importance du lieu et de la communion intense avec la nature n’est pas incompatible avec les voyages des ancêtres qui traversaient le Pacifique dans tous les sens, ni avec les sentiers de la coutume et les échanges entre tribus, mais le lieu, qui donne son nom à la tribu, reste primordial. Les lieux de Görödé opposent la tribu (à la fois les pays coutumiers et les gens qui l’habitent) à Nouméa la Blanche afin de contester la domination de l’imaginaire national français et sa conception de la relation entre Nouméa, la brousse (des colons), et la tribu. Toutefois l’œuvre de Déwé Görödé articule un ‘Place to Stand’ (lieu d’origine et de résistance indigène) et aussi un être en procès, critique, qui se situe dans un ‘no man’s land’. Enfin, ses lieux d’écriture sont ‘cognitivement dissonants’ et multiples : ils constituent la marge et le « hinterland » qu’occupe la tribu, mais tout en s’ouvrant aussi à une occupation de la ville et à une critique interne.

A Place to Stand: Land and Water in Māori Film | Deborah Walker-Morrison

L’identité Māori néo-zélandaise, à l’instar des autres peuples indigènes du monde, est inextricablement liée à un sens de l’origine géographique : Tūrangawaewae, littéralement “un endroit pour poser ses pieds.” Le lieu spécifique domine ici la conception du territoire, mais cela n’exclut pas pour autant les rivières, les lacs et l’océan qui ont permis la survie du peuple Māori depuis son arrivée à Aotearoa, il y a près de mille ans. En rapprochant les représentations de la terre et de l’eau de la double métaphore des « routes » et des « racines », cet article examine les questions de la perte, de la conservation, de la récupération et/ou de la transformation en lien avec le sentiment du lieu en tant qu’il occupe une place centrale dans le cinéma de fiction Māori.

Black Wool and Vintage Shoes: The Wellington Look | Felicity Perry

“Il m’a dit que je n’avais pas l’air de venir de Wellington.” C’est ce qu’une amie venant d’une petite ville à deux heures de Wellington m’a confié il y a quelques années alors que nous partagions des cocktails dans un bar local. Cet article s’interroge: de quel aspect de Wellington est-il question dans une telle affirmation? En quoi exprime-t-il une idée de Wellington comme centre artistique et politique de Aotearoa/Nouvelle-Zélande? On y examine en particulier comment les habitants de Wellington définissent leur identité urbaine à travers leur style vestimentaire, à travers l’analyse des façons dont les boutiques et fabricants de Wellington créent un style qui se voudrait idiosyncrasique.

Imagining Place: An Empirical Study of How Cultural Outsiders and Insiders Receive Fictional Representations of Place in Caryl Férey’s Utu | Ellen Carter

Cet article veut offrir la preuve empirique que les lecteurs provenant respectivement d’une culture extérieure (France), et intérieure (Nouvelle-Zélande), sont influencés différemment par les éléments géographiquement et culturellement situés dans Utu (France 2004; traduction anglaise 2011), un roman policier de l’auteur français Caryl Férey se déroulant dans la Nouvelle-Zélande d’aujourd’hui. L’étude s’appuie sur une enquête longitudinale interculturelle de la réception au sein du lectorat. Après lecture du roman, les lecteurs culturellement externes et internes ont chacun changé leur opinion quant à l’image véhiculée par Férey, même lorsque ses représentations culturelles s’avèrent incorrectes. Qui plus est, aux yeux des lecteurs français, cette influence s’étend au-delà du roman lui-même, et semble se porter sur la Nouvelle-Zélande elle-même, avec ses habitants.

NZ@Frankfurt: Imagining New Zealand’s Guest of Honour Presentation at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair from the Point of View of Literary Translation | Angela Kölling

Comptant plus de 7,000 exposants, une centaine de pays participants, et au-delà de 300,000 visiteurs chaque année, la Foire du Livre de Francfort est un vivier pour les imaginaires politique, économique, et culturels, et met ainsi en représentation plusieurs lieu locaux et étrangers. La Foire du Livre est fréquemment conçue et envisagée comme un site de commerce international et de tractations politiques, mais elle n’a pas été étudiée en tant que site propre à la traduction et à l’agentivité du rôle de traducteur. Cet article offre une réflexion critique sur la métaphore pour le traducteur, en arguant qu’un déplacement, dans les études en littérature comparée de la traduction, de la conception basique de la métaphore du conflit à la friction peut engager les études interdisciplinaires de la traduction dans une voie inexplorée. Je propose que la métaphore frictionnelle pointe vers un équilibre entre les détails complexes et une réduction des données qui permet de décrire l’intensité et les défis de la traduction sans retomber dans les poncifs ou paraphraser les connaissances acquises.

Filmstadt in the Vorstadt: Locationality in the Filmmaking Practice of Mihály/ Michael Kertész/ Curtiz | Susan Ingram

Cet article examine le plus monumental film muet produit dans la république d’Autriche: Sodom und Gomorrha (1922). Avec l’exploration du site de tournage du film, une enclave de grès et de friches à la frontière sud de Vienne, on examine comment l’histoire passée du site et son incarnation actuelle comme Kurpark révèlent l’imaginaire urbain du cinéaste et le rôle de la technologie dans sa participation à la modernité. On établit en outre certain parallèles entre les premiers films qu’il a réalisés sous le nom de Michael Kertész et le succès plus tardif de son film-culte Casablanca.

High-Rise Zhivago | Elena Siemens

Cet article examine la production par le Théâtre Taganka de Docteur Zhivagode Boris Pasternak dans une maison de la culture en banlieue de Moscou. Marvin Carlson a proposé que les espaces performatifs joue un rôle à part entière dans le sens global d’un spectacle. Suite à Carlson, je propose à mon tour qu’en étant montée dans une banlieue de Moscou, la production Taganka réinterprète radicalement Docteur Zhivago, le faisant passer d’un récit individualisé à un récit collectif. L’article interroge des représentations fragmentaires du Moscou historique, des banlieues construites sous les Soviets, en plus de points de vue sur l’habitabilité suburbaine empruntés à des théoriciens culturels, des architectes, et des auteurs. Le tout est illustré et appuyé par des photos de bâtiment suburbains inspirés de Alexander Rodchenko, ainsi que des photos de conserves Campbell et de caisses de Coca-Cola rendant hommage au travail de Andy Warhol. L’article se conclut avec l’image nostalgique d’une ancienne maison familiale, proche de l’esprit original de Boris Pasternak.

It’s a Kind of Magic: Situating Nostalgia for Technological Progress and the Occult in Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes | Markus Reisenleitner

Le succès récent du blockbuster de Guy Ritchie revisitant la figure de Sherlock Holmes s’inscrit dans une lignée récente de films et de récits populaires qui ont revivifié un imaginaire nostalgique du passé londonien dans lequel le centre de l’ancien empire britannique se trouve au croisement d’un conflit manichéen entre un progrès scientifico-technologique et les traditions d’un savoir occulte supposément enfouis dans les siècles précédents mais qui continue à s’insinuer au cœur de l’empire à partir de ses colonies. En retraçant certaines de ces couches historiques dans les recréations contemporaines du Londres impérial, cet article explore les mécanismes de production de la nostalgie dans la culture populaire en tant qu’ils font le pont entre la mémoire publique et la mémoire historique en rattachant celles-ci à un imaginaire de la géographie urbaine qui pour sa part pointe vers la ville globale d’aujourd’hui.

À propos des contributeurs

Ellen Carter est étudiante au doctorat en co-tutelle avec l’université d’Auckland en Nouvelle-Zélande et l’École Des Hautes-Études en Sciences Sociales à Paris. Ses recherches portent sur les lectures, les écritures, et les traductions excentrées du récit policier.

Susan Ingram est professeure associée au Department of Humanities de l’université York, à Toronto. Elle y est affiliée au Canadian Centre for German and European Studies, et au Research Group on Translation and Transcultural Contact. Elle est rédactrice en chef de la série Intellect Book’s Urban Chic, et a dirigé le volume sur Berlin de la série World Film Locations.

Angela Kölling est chercheure postdoctorale au Centre for European Research de l’université Gothenburg en Suède. Elle a reçu son doctorat en littérature comparée de l’université d’Auckland. Elle a fait publier ses travaux comparés sur l’essai dans la France et l’Allemagne d’après 1989 sous le titre Writing on the Loose (Weidler Berlin) en 2012. Ses recherches actuelles portent sur le rôle et l’auto-positionnement des traducteurs littéraires dans les systèmes coopératifs interculturels comme les sommets culturels et les foires du livre. Elle s’intéresse en particulier aux métaphores et à leur effets sur l’équilibre entre vie et travail, de même que sur la portée du travail des traducteurs tant du point vue professionnel que du point de vie de la recherche académique.

Martin Parrot est documentariste, étudiant au doctorat en Humanities à York University, et blogueur/critique culturel pour monlimoilou.com.

Felicity Perry est auteure d’une thèse de doctorat sur la relation entre l’habillement, l’identité, et les médias. Elle y a examiné comment les étudiants d’une école sans uniforme obligatoire en Aotearoa/Nouvelle Zélande utilisent l’habillement et les discours qui s’y attachent afin d’exprimer leur identité. Ses recherches s’enracinent dans un intérêt pour la relation entre les médias et les mécanismes de la vie quotidienne, notamment les façons dont les sexes, la sexualité, la race, les classes sociales et les apparences s’entremêlent dans les interactions sociales. Elle habite actuellement à Tel-Aviv, et y reste à l’affut des multiples occasions d’analyse de l’habillement social qui parsèment cette ville.

Raylene Ramsay est professeure de Franςais à l’Université d’Auckland en Nouvelle-Zélande. Elle a publié une histoire culturelle de la Nouvelle-Calédonie à travers 110  textes littéraires traduits en anglais et commentés (Nights of Storytelling, University Press of Hawaï) et a co-traduit le premier roman (L’Épave) et les poèmes de l’auteure kanake Déwé Görödé avec Deborah Walker-Morrison (dans Sharing as Custom Provides, Pandanus Press). Une étude de l’hybridité dans les littératures francophones du Pacifique paraîtra chez Liverpool University Press en 2014. Son travail sur les femmes au pouvoir, French Women in Politics: Writing Power, Paternal Legitimization and Maternal Legacies (Berghahn Press, Oxford and New York) est paru en 2003. Elle a aussi publié sur Alain Robbe-Grillet, Claude Simon, Nathalie Sarraute, et Marguerite Duras (The French New Autobiographies, et Robbe-Grillet and Modernity: Science, Sexuality, and Subversion, University Press of Florida).

Markus Reisenleitner est professeur associé et directeur du programme gradué au Department of Humanities de l’Université York à Toronto. Ses recherches et publications portent sur les imaginaires urbains, la mode, et les cultures digitales.

Katrina Sark est candidate au doctorat au Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures de l’Université McGill. Elle se spécialise en analyse culturelle et en études urbaines. Katrina est la co-auteure de Berliner Chic: A Locational History of Berlin Fashion (avec Susan Ingram), et a participé au travail de recherche pour le livre Wiener Chic. Ses photos ont paru dans Inquire: Journal of Comparative Literature (2010), Berliner Chic (2011), World Film Locations: Berlin (2012), ainsi que sur son blog: http://suitesculturelles.wordpress.com/. Elle habite à Montréal.

Elena Siemens est professeure associée au Department of Modern Languages & Cultural Studies de l’université de l’Alberta. Ses recherches portent sur les cultures visuelles, la théorie et la pratique de la photographie, la performance (notamment du point de vue spatial), et les théories critiques et les études culturelles. Elle est l’auteure de Theatre in Passing: A Moscow Photo-Diary (Intellect UK 2011), et a dirigé deux dossiers en revue: The Dark Spectacle: Landscapes of Devastation in Film and Photography (Space and Culture: International Journal of Social Spaces, Été 2014), et Scandals of Horror (Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Images Studies, 1-4, 2013).

Deborah Walker-Morrison est Senior Lecturer et directrice du programe de français à l’Université d’Auckland en Aotearoa/Nouvelle-Zélande. Ses principaux intérêts de recherche son le cinéma français, le cinéma Maori, et les études de traduction (avec une concentration particulière sur la traduction des littératures indigènes du Pacifique. D’origine européenne et Maori, ses attaches à la Nouvelle-Zélande sont Rākai Pāka et le Ngāti Pahuwera hapu de Ngāti Kāhungunu. Outre de nombreux articles et chapitres de livre elle a fait publier French and American Noir: Dark Crossings (Palgrave 2009, avec Alistair Rolls) et Le style cinématographique d’Alain Resnais (Edwin Mellen Press, 2012).