Imaginations 4-2 | Media and Mothers’ Matters

Guest Editor Oluyinka Esan

Table of Contents

Artist Interview—Superstrumps: the Card Game with a Mission | Syd Moore and Heidi Wigmore in Conversation with Oluyinka Esan

From Soap Opera to Reality Programming: Examining Motherhood, Motherwork and the Maternal Role on Popular Television | Rebecca Feasey

Motherhood and the media under the Microscope: The backlash against feminism and the Mommy Wars | Kim Akass

Tea with Mother: Sarah Palin and the Discourse of Motherhood as a Political Ideal | Janet McCabe

General Contribution

Adult Fear and Control: Ambivalence and Duality in Clive Barker’s The Thief of Always | Gabrielle Kristjanson


Full Issue PDF | http://dx.doi.org/10.17742/IMAGE.mother.4-2


Article Abstracts

Artist Interview – Superstrumps: the Card Game with a Mission Syd Moore and Heidi Wigmore in Conversation with Oluyinka Esan | Oluyinka Esan

The artist interview in this dossier is an example of collaborative work between an artist and a writer.  It is a showcase of how popular culture can be re-appropriated.  The interviewees are the co-creators of the card game Superstrumps developed to address the issue of stereotyping of women.  In the interview, they recount the process of creating the game involving other women from their local community.  This exemplifies how a strategy for resisting and reclaiming identities undermined by negative labelling is developed.   Their views are strongly shaped by their feminist principles. The interview acknowledges the complex nature of identities, the challenge of media representation and the symbiotic relationship between media and audiences is revealed.

From Soap Opera to Reality Programming: Examining Motherhood, Motherwork and the Maternal Role on Popular Television | Rebecca Feasey

Representations of motherhood dominate the television landscape in a variety of popular genre texts, and as such it is important that we consider the ways in which these women are being constructed and circulated on the small screen. Indeed, although much work has been done to investigate the depiction of women on television, little research exists to account for the portrayal of mothering, motherhood, and the maternal role. With this in mind, this article introduces extant literature concerning the representation of motherhood in the media and then examines ways in which this research might be understood in relation to the depiction of mothers in soap opera, situation comedy, teen drama, dramedy and reality television. It considers the ways in which popular television texts form a consensus as they negotiate the idealized image of the ‘good’ mother in favour of a more attainable depiction of ‘good enough’ mothering which stands apart from the romanticized image of the ideal mother that dominates the broader entertainment arena.

Motherhood and the Media under the Microscope: The Backlash Against Feminism and the Mommy Wars |Kim Akass

Despite the passing of sexual discrimination legislation, the difficulty of combining work and motherhood repeatedly hits the headlines.  This paper looks at the American media phenomenon known as the ‘mommy wars’ and asks if British mothers can expect to face the same issues and attitudes as their American sisters.

Tea with Mother: Sarah Palin and the Discourse of Motherhood as a Political Ideal |Janet McCabe

Seldom has someone emerged so unexpectedly and sensationally on to the American political scene as Sarah Palin.  With Palin came what had rarely, if ever, been seen before on a presidential trail: hockey moms, Caribou-hunting, pitbulls in lipstick parcelled as political weaponry. And let’s not forget those five children, including Track 19, set to deploy to Iraq, Bristol, and her unplanned pregnancy at 17, and Trig, a six-month-old infant with Down’s syndrome.  Never before had motherhood been so finely balanced with US presidential politics. Biological vigour translated into political energy, motherhood transformed into an intoxicating political ideal. This article focuses on Sarah Palin and how her brand of “rugged Alaskan motherhood” (PunditMom 2008) became central to her media image, as well as what this representation has to tell us about the relationship between mothering as a political ideal, US politics, and the media.

Adult Fear and Control: Ambivalence and Duality in Clive Barker’s The Thief of Always | Gabrielle Kristjanson

This article considers the relationship between the text and accompanying illustrations in Clive Barker’s children’s novel The Thief of Always: A Fable. This tale of abduction was published in the social background of fear around the child predator of the early 1990s and incorporates ideas of monstrous villainy, loss of childhood innocence, and insatiable desires.  As a fable, Thief is a cautionary tale that not only teaches that childhood years are precious and are not to be wished away or squandered in idle leisure, but also of the dangers that some adults pose to children. Problematically, an honest and frank discussion of adult sexual desires toward children would despoil the very innocence that is trying to be protected; thus, a lesson such as this must be sublimated within the story. Yet, it is the illustrations, and more specifically the way in which the illustrations corroborate and contradict the plot of this story that reveals an underlying ambivalence toward the figure of the child and an echoing duality present in both the child and the child predator.

About the Contributors

Akass, Kim is a lecturer in Film and TV at the University of Hertfordshire.  She has co-edited and contributed to Reading Sex and the City (IB Tauris, 2004), Reading Six Feet Under: TV To Die For (IB Tauris, 2005), Reading The L Word: Outing Contemporary Television (IB Tauris, 2006), Reading Desperate Housewives: Beyond the White Picket Fence (IB Tauris, 2006) and Quality TV: Contemporary American TV and Beyond (IB Tauris, 2007).  She is currently researching the representation of motherhood in the media and is one of the founding editors of the television journal Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies (MUP), managing editor of CSTonline as well as (with McCabe) series editor of the ‘Reading Contemporary Television’ for IB Tauris.  Their new collection TV’s Betty Goes Global: From Telenovela to International Brand was published last year.

Esan, Oluyinka is a Reader in the School of Film and Media at the University of Winchester UK.   Her research focuses on media production practices and reception of media messages especially by women and children.  This is informed by her interest in social relevance of media messages and their impact on society.  Through her empirical studies in non-Western contexts, Oluyinka offers fresh perspectives which enrich conceptualisations of media and film practices. Her recent works offer insight into audience pleasures and the valuing of films (Nollywood).  She is the author of Nigerian Television, Fifty Years of Television in Africa (AMV Publishers Princeton NJ, 2009).   Her current project is Watching Television: What Nigerian Children Want. Dr Esan convened the roundtable event on Media and Mothers’ Matters (October 2011) at which earlier versions of papers in this dossier were first presented.

Feasey, Rebecca is Senior Lecturer in Film and Media Communications at Bath Spa University. She has published a range of work on celebrity culture, contemporary Hollywood stardom and the representation of gender in popular media culture. She has published in journals such as the Quarterly Review of Film and Video, the Journal of Popular Film and Television, the Journal of Gender Studies, Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. She has written book length studies on masculinity and popular television (EUP, 2008) and motherhood on the small screen (Anthem, 2012). She is currently writing a research monograph on maternal readings of motherhood on television (Peter Lang, 2015).

Kristjanson, Gabrielle is a PhD candidate in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She holds a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Arts in Comparative Literature, both obtained at the University of Alberta, Canada. Her research revolves around the manifestation of moral panic and criminal monstrosity in Western literature, and her dissertation is on fictional representations of the child predator in adult and children’s literature.

McCabe, Janet is Lecturer in Film, Television and Creative Industries at Birkbeck, University of London. She edits Critical Studies in Television and has written widely on feminism, cultural memory / politics and television. She co-edited several collections, including Quality TV: Contemporary American TV and Beyond (2007) and Reading Sex and the City (2004), and her latest works include The West Wing (2012) and TV’s Betty Goes Global: From Telenovela to International Brand (2012; co-edited with Kim Akass).

Moore, Syd is the author of The Drowning Pool and Witch Hunt, novels which explore Essex witch hunts.  She is currently working on her third book, The Sacrifice.  Before embarking on a career in education, Syd worked extensively in the publishing industry, fronting Channel 4’s book programme, Pulp.  She was the founding editor of Level 4, an arts and culture magazine, and is co-creator of Superstrumps, the game that reclaims female stereotypes. When she is not writing Syd works for Metal Culture, an arts organisation, promoting arts and cultural events and developing literature programmes.

Wigmore, Heidi is a visual artist and fine art lecturer. She studied at Norwich School of Art and completed an MA at the University of East London in 2001. Her practice is drawing based but multidisciplinary, incorporating installation, props and film. Her imagery is overtly figurative but dislocated, she is interested in the (imperfect) imitation of the human: the doll/mannequin/dummy, the human simulacrum.  Heidi’s public art projects include a temporary billboard artwork in central London, ‘Independent Free State’, that explored the female form as map/territory and customized beach huts at The South Bank Centre for the Festival of Britain in 2011. She has lectured for University of Essex and Anglia Ruskin University. She currently runs workshops with English National Ballet and is an artistic assessor for Arts Council England.

Résumés des articles

Artist Interview – Superstrumps: the Card Game with a Mission Syd Moore and Heidi Wigmore in Conversation with Oluyinka Esan | Oluyinka Esan

L’entretien dans ce dossier illustre bien le potentiel des collaborations entre artistes et écrivains. On y voit comment la culture populaire peut être réappropriée. Les participants ont créé ensemble le jeu de cartes Superstrumps afin d’aborder la question des stéréotypes sur les femmes. Dans l’entretien ils reviennent sur le processus de création du jeu dans lequel des femmes de leur communauté locale se sont impliquées, et à travers lequel a été mis en place une stratégie de réappropriation des identités dévaluées par des représentations négatives. Leur point de vue est fortement influencé par leur principes féministes. L’entretien tient compte de la nature multiple des identités et du défi posé par les représentations médiatiques ; au bout du compte c’est la relation symbiotique entre les média et leurs audiences qui émerge.

From Soap Opera to Reality Programming: Examining Motherhood, Motherwork and the Maternal Role on Popular Television | Rebecca Feasey

Les représentations de la maternité pullulent sous différentes formes génériques dans le paysage télévisuel; il est important d’examiner leur construction et leur circulation sur leur petit écran. En dépit d’une littérature fort chargée s’intéressant à la représentation des femmes à la télévision, il existe peu de travaux sur la mise en scène corollaire de la maternité. Cet article retrace dans un premier temps les travaux existants, puis explore les applications possibles de ces recherches quant à la représentation des mères dans les soap-opera, les comédies de situation, les séries pour adolescents, les comédies dramatiques, et la télé-réalité. On y voit émerger les façons dont un consensus se forme dans le paysage télévisuel alors que chaque représentation cherche à négocier la différence entre une maternité idéale, et une « maternité acceptable » qui pour sa part se distancierait de la perfection inatteignable prônée dans le domaine plus vaste du spectacle en général.

Motherhood and the Media under the Microscope: The Backlash Against Feminism the Mommy Wars |Kim Akass

Malgré les législations contre la discrimination des sexes qui s’accumulent, la difficulté d’harmoniser maternité et occupations professionnelles n’en occupe pas moins le haut du pavé et continue de faire actualité. Cet article examine le phénomène médiatique américain connu sous le nom de « mommy wars » et s’interroge sur la distinction entre les défis de la maternité en Angleterre et aux États-Unis.

Tea with Mother: Sarah Palin and the Discourse of Motherhood as a Political Ideal |Janet McCabe

Très peu d’individus ont fait une apparition aussi inattendue et spectaculaire que celle de Sarah Palin sur la scène politique américaine. Avec elle ont surgi des traits inédits dans une campagnes présidentielle : ceux de la hockey mom, de la chasse au caribou, de la femme pugnace mais fardée utilisés comme des arguments partisans. Cela sans oublier les enfants Palin mis à contribution : Track, 19 ans, attendant son affectation militaire en Irak, Bristol, fille-mère à 17 ans, et Trig, un bébé trisomique de six mois. Une image si orientée de la maternité n’avait jamais auparavant été impliquée dans une campagne politique aux États-Unis. La vigueur génétique s’y est vue transformée en énergie politique, et la maternité en un idéal politique intoxicant. Cet article se concentre sur la façon dont l’image d’une « rugged Alaskan motherhood » (PunditMon 2008) est devenue si cruciale dans la personnalité médiatique de Sarah Palin, et sur ce qu’une telle image peut nous apprendre quant aux relations entre la maternité comme idéal, la politique américaine, et les média.

Adult Fear and Control: Ambivalence and Duality in Clive Barker’s The Thief of Always | Gabrielle Kristjanson

Cet article analyse le rapport entre le texte et les illustrations dans le livre pour enfants de Clive Barker intitulé The Thief of Always: A Fable. Barker a écrit cette histoire d’enlèvement dans le contexte social de la peur du prédateur d’enfants au début des années 90. Il y a mis en scène les idées d’un méchant monstrueux, de la perte de l’innocence enfantine, et des désirs insatiables. En tant que fable, le livre est un conte de mise en garde, qui non seulement enseigne que l’enfance est précieuse, étant nécessaire pour chaque enfant qui ne doit pas la gaspiller paresseusement, mais aussi qu’il existe un danger que certains adultes peuvent poser face aux enfants. Une réflexion sincère sur les désirs sexuels adultes face aux enfants étant problématique parce qu’elle dépouille l’innocence qu’on cherche à protéger. Barker a donc dû sublimer une telle leçon dans le récit. Ce sont alors les illustrations et leur rapport au récit à la fois corroborant et contractif qui révèlent une ambivalence cachée du personnage enfant, ainsi qu’une dualité présente dans les deux personnages : l’enfant et le prédateur d’enfants.

À propos des contributeurs

Akass, Kim est lecturer en études cinématographiques et télévisuelles à l’Université de Hertfordshire. Elle a coédité et contribué aux ouvrages collectifs Reading Sex and the City (IB Tauris, 2004), Reading Six Feet Under: TV To Die For (IB Tauris, 2005), Reading The L Word: Outing Contemporary Television (IB Tauris, 2006), Reading Desperate Housewives: Beyond the White Picket Fence (IB Tauris, 2006), et Quality TV: Contemporary American TV and Beyond (IB Tauris, 2007). Elle mène actuellement des recherches sur la représentation de la maternité dans les média. Elle est co-fondatrice de la revue d’études télévisuelles Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies (MUP), éditrice exécutive de CSTonline, et éditrice associée de la série « Reading Contemporary Television » chez IB Tauris dont le plus récent ouvrage TV’s Betty Goes Global: From Telenovela to International Brand est paru en 2012.

Esan, Oluyinka est reader à la School of Film and Media de l’Université de Winchester, UK. Elle mène des recherches sur les pratiques de production médiatique et la réception des messages médiatiques, en particulier chez les femmes et les enfants. Ces travaux s’inscrivent dans le cadre plus large de ses intérêts pour la pertinence et l’impact sociaux des messages médiatiques. À travers ses travaux empiriques en contextes non occidentaux, Oluyinka suggère des perspectives neuves à même d’enrichir nos conceptions des pratiques médiatiques et filmiques. Ses travaux les plus récents examine la notion de plaisir spectateur en lien avec différents échelles de mise en valeur des pratiques cinématographiques (Nolywood). Elle est l’auteure de Nigerian Television, Fifty Years of Television in Africa (AMV Publishers Princeton NJ, 2009). Elle travaille actuellement à l’écriture d’un nouveau livre intitulé Watching Television: What Nigerian Children Want. Elle a organise la table-ronde « Media and Mothers’ Matters » (Octobre 2011) dans laquelle ont été présentées les premières versions des articles du présent dossier.

Feasey, Rebecca est senior lecturer en communications, cinéma, et média à l’Université de Bath Spa. Elle a fait paraître de nombreux textes sur la culture de la célébrité, le star-system hollywoodien contemporain, et la représentation des sexes dans la culture médiatique populaire. Elle a publié dans des revues comme le Quarterly Review of Film and Video, le Journal of Popular Film and Television, le Journal of Gender Studies, Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies et le European Journal of Cultural Studies. Elle est d’autre part auteure d’études approfondies sur la masculinité et la culture télévisuelle populaire (EUP, 2008), ainsi que la maternité au petit écran (Anthem, 2012). Elle rédige actuellement une monographie sur les interprétations par des mères de la maternité télévisuelle (à paraître chez Peter Lang, 2015).

Kristjanson, Gabrielle : est doctorante à l’Université de Melbourne en Australie (à l’école de la culture et de la communication). Elle est titulaire d’un baccalauréat ès sciences et d’une maîtrise ès arts de l’Université de l’Alberta au Canada. Elle mène des recherches dans les domaines de la manifestation de la panique morale et de la monstruosité criminelle dans la littérature occidentale. Sa thèse se concentre sur les représentations fictives du prédateur d’enfants dans la littérature adulte et de jeunesse.

McCabe, Janet est lecturer en études des films, de la télévision, et des industries de la création à l’Université Birkbeck de Londres. Elle est éditrice de Critical Studies in Television et a écrit sur le féminisme, la mémoire culturelle et politique de la télévision. Elle a coédité plusieurs ouvrages collectifs, dont Quality TV: Contemporary American TV and Beyond (2007) et Reading Sex and the City (2004). Ses plus récents travaux sont The West Wing (2012) et TV’s Betty Goes Global: From Telenovela to International Brand (2012; avec Kim Akass).

Moore, Syd est l’auteure de The Drowning Pool et de Witch Hunt, deux romans qui centrés sur les chasses aux sorcières d’Essex. Elle travaille actuellement à son troisième livre, intitulé The Sacrifice. Avant d’entamer une carrière en éducation, elle a œuvré longuement dans le monde de l’édition, en dirigeant notamment l’émission sur la littérature de Channel 4 : « Pulp ». Elle est fondatrice du défunt magazine sur l’art et la culture Level 4, et co-créatrice de Superstrumps, un jeu axé sur la réappropriation des stéréotypes de la féminité. Quand elle n’écrit pas, Syd œuvre auprès de Metal Culture, un organisme pour la promotion d’événements culturels et artistiques et le développement de programmes en littérature.

Wigmore, Heidi est artiste visuelle et lecturer en Beaux-Arts. Elle a étudié à la Norwich School of Arts et obtenu une maîtrise de la University of East London en 2001. Ses travaux sont basés sur le dessin mais demeurent multidisciplinaires en incorporant l’installation, ainsi que des accessoires et des extraits filmiques. Son imagerie est à la fois figurative et disloquée, et elle s’intéresse aux imitations toujours forcément imparfaites de la figure humaine telles que la poupée, le mannequin et le pantin. Parmi ses projets publics on trouve notamment « Independant Free State », un détournement temporaire de panneau publicitaire au cœur de Londres qui explorait la forme féminine en tant que carte/territoire, ainsi qu’une série de cabines de plage transformées au South Bank Centre pour l’édition 2011 du Festival of Britain. Elle a été lecturer à l’Université de Essex et à la Angela Ruskin University. Elle dirige actuellement des ateliers en collaboration avec le English National Ballet, et occupe la position d’évaluatrice artistique pour le Arts Council England.